News

First Microelectronics Synergy Grants

According to Professor Geert Leus who heads the ME Research Committee, the Synergy Grants are also intended to kick-start the research of young faculty, as it can be quite challenging for them to obtain funding at the beginning of their research careers. The grants cover half the costs of a PhD candidate, with the rest coming from existing research funding. ‘The submitted proposals were carefully evaluated by the ME Research Committee on the basis of their scientific quality, their clarity and feasibility, the synergy between the participating sections, and the relationship to the departmental themes. The ME Management Team (MT) then decided to award Synergy Grants to the top three proposals.’

Changes

The aim of the grants is to encourage newly emerging combinations of technologies and to facilitate cross-overs between them, thus strengthening and broadening the department's research portfolio. This goal fits seamlessly within the research strategy of ME, which has defined itself around the four themes of Health & Wellbeing, XG, Safety & Security and Autonomous Systems to better address societal challenges.

Winners

Last week, the winners were received by the ME MT. They received flowers from the head of the department (Kofi Makinwa) and had the opportunity to briefly present their proposals to the assembled MT. Below are short descriptions of the successful proposals.

Akira Endo & Sten Vollebregt: ‘The aim of our project TANDEM: Terahertz Astronomy with Novel DiElectric Materials is to develop advanced dielectric materials to realize superconducting microstrip lines with very low losses in the frequency ranges of 2-10 GHz and 100-1000 GHz. The PhD candidate will combine the dielectric deposition, characterization, material expertise and facilities of the ECTM group and the Else Kooi Laboratory, and the submillimetre wave device measurement capability of the THz Sensing Group and SRON. The aim is not only to realize low loss dielectrics, but also to understand the underlying physics that governs these losses. If successful, these microstrips will be immediately applied to enhance the sensitivity of the DESHIMA spectrometer on the ASTE telescope in Chile.’

Bori Hunyadi: ‘On one hand, the vast complexity of the human brain (10^11 neurons and 10^14 connections) enables us to process large amounts of information in the fraction of a second. At the same time, imperfections of the wiring in this vast network cause devastating neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy or schizophrenia. Therefore, understanding brain function is one of the greatest and most important scientific challenges of our times. Brain function manifests as various physical phenomena (electrical or e.g. metabolic) at different spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, the PhD candidate working on this grant will develop a novel multimodal and multiresolution brain imaging paradigm combining EEG and a novel imaging technique, fUS. The specific engineering challenge is to understand and describe the fUS signal characteristics, deal with the large amount of data it records using efficient computational tools; and finally, formulate the specification of a dedicated non-invasive, multimodal, wearable EEG-fUS device.’

Virgilio Valente & Massimo Mastrangeli: ‘The seed money of the Synergy Grant will partially support a joint PhD candidate to investigate the tight integration of an heart-on-chip device with dedicated electronic instrumentation in the same platform. Our aim is to bring sensing and readout electronics as close as possible to a cardiac tissue cultivated within a dedicated micro physiological device. The grant helps promoting the logical convergence between current departmental research activities at ECTM and BE and within the Netherlands Organ-on-Chip Initiative (NOCI) on the development of instrumented organ-on-chip devices.’

News

Vasiliki Giagka appointed associate editor for Bioelectronic Medicine

Vasiliki Giagka, assistant professor at the Bioelectronics Group at Delft University of Technology, has been invited to the editorial board of Bioelectronic Medicine. The journal asked Giagka for her expertise in fabrication microsystem integration and packaging for neural implants. With her appointment, Giagka is currently one of the youngest associate editors working for the journal.

Wouter Serdijn nieuw lid Wetenschappelijke Raad Medical Delta

Het bestuur van Medical Delta heeft Wouter Serdijn op 7 februari benoemd tot lid van de Wetenschappelijke Raad van Medical Delta. De Wetenschappelijke Raad heeft een belangrijke taak in het realiseren van de doelstelling 'Technologische oplossingen voor duurzame zorg; Van Molecuul tot Toepassing'. De raad telt 26 leden en is sinds eind 2018 actief.

First Microelectronics Synergy Grants

The department of Microelectronics (ME) has just awarded its first Synergy Grants to three research teams. As the name implies, these grants are intended to strengthen the synergy between the research done by the various sections of the ME department. The main authors of the winning research proposals are Akira Endo & Sten Vollebregt, Virgilio Valente & Massimo Mastrangeli and Bori Hunyadi.

Microelectronics at work for sustainable healthcare

Institutions in the Medical Delta (a consortium consisting of TU Delft, Erasmus MC, LUMC, Leiden University and Erasmus University Rotterdam) are starting a broad and unique scientific programme in the field of technological research into innovative solutions for sustainable healthcare. This will involve an investment of five million euros over the next five years.

Health Prototype Grant for Virgilio Valente

Virgilio (Vivo) Valente received a Health Prototype Grant of €10K from the Delft Health Initiative for his proposal in the domains of Lab-on-CMOS and Organs-on-a-Chip.